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Tuesday, February 15, 2011

Antarctica, Walking Around Whalers Bay

 

The wind here seems even stronger than on the ship as Peter and I stroll around the black volcanic surface of Whalers Bay.

 

 

WB Hills Now somewhat in a valley, we are closer to the surrounding hills and that maybe a contributing factor.

 

 

 

 

We are told that in a few months this area will be covered with green plant life along with penguins that like to spend the spring time here. For now, there are only a few of them.

 

 

 

WB Chilin Peguin Chilin Penguin On Whalers Bay

 

 

 

WB Burrowed Penguin Here, they are smart enough to stand with their backs to the wind or burrow into the ground for protection from it.

 

 

 

 

WB Sleeping Bird Even some birds are dug in and asleep with their heads turned backwards to guard against the unrelenting wind.

 

 

 

 

 

WB Skua Skua

 

 

 

WB Antarctic Gull Meanwhile, a few skuas have gathered near pools of standing water where others are taking bird baths.

 

 

 

 

I imagine with the blowing wind the temperature is somewhere in the 30 degree or less range. However, I am quite comfortable thanks to the parka provided by Quark Expedition.

 

 

3 Birds Feeding Along the shoreline,  I am reminded of the famous Bob Marley's song “Three Little Birds”.

 

 

 

 

However, the birds I am watching are sitting on crashing frigid waves and I don't think they are singing sweet songs and melodies.

I quietly wonder with a smile if there has ever been a Jamaican Antarctic Expedition Team. I know for a fact there has not been one from The Bahamas.

 

 

WB Decaying Shack Scattered around this area of the bay are the decaying and fragile remains of the whaling industry.

 

 

 

We are cautioned to be careful and not to touch them while viewing them. It is amazing that some of the buildings were habitable given that the conditions here can become so cold and severe.

 

 

WB Decaying Boat Old Whaling Boat

 

 

Next we head towards Neptune’s Window where we hope to get a glimpse of the actual Antarctica Continent which is about 19 miles away.

 

 

WB Neptune's Window Neptune’s Window

 

 

 

 

 

Then something interesting happens. Peter, Peter …..

 

 

 

2 comments:

E Squared and Mui said...

You sure had rough conditions at Whaler's Bay ... but nice to see that the landing proceeded anyway.

DMBTraveler said...

Yes, it was pretty windy the whole afternoon but those parkas and being layered kept most of us warm :)