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Wednesday, April 20, 2011

Antarctica, Officially On The Blue Continent

 

 

Ioffe From Neko Harbor After a great zodiac tour of the area,  our landing at Neko Harbor officially places us on The Blue Continent, Antarctica.

 

 

 

 

On Blue Continent Although I have much more to experience here and else where around the globe, a part of my dream is complete.

I have now traveled to all seven continents.

 

 

 

 

 

The Blue ContinentThe Blue Continent

 

 

Our landing allows for a bit of snow hill hiking where we can take in elevated views of the surrounding area. The Ioffe sits anchored in the harbor below as a colony of Gentoo Penguins are squawking up a storm while standing around in guano.

 

Colony Landing Not to be left out a bird circles the area then lands to check out what all the fuss is about.

 

 

 

With warming weather, the snow is beginning to turn soft and walking off the designated path presents some problems. One of which is the creation of large deep footprints.

 

 

Walking Penguin In one of our daily meal chats, we learn these can present a dangerous task for our Antarctic friends.

Partially filling them in can significantly reduce their risk of death.

 

 

 

 

Neko Harbor Hill

 

 

Besides another series of spectacular views, this landing provides another reward for those that are a bit adventurous. Fun downhill snow sledding without the sled.

 

 

Downhill Dr. Tim leads the charge for some.

He waits half way down the hill to make sure the thrill does not stall out.

 

 

 

Skua Walking down the hill,  a lone skua sits along the path not bothered by a bright yellow spectator.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leopard Seals Basking Leopard Seals

 

 

 

Sleeping Leo I watch awhile until it takes off in flight then I admire a few seals laying around that always seem happy to see me.

 

 

 

 

 

To The Ship As if being a tour guide, a penguin walks along the path ahead of us as we make our way back to the Ioffe.

 

 

 

I am sure it would make an excellent tour guide although we might just have a little language barrier.

 

 

 

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